Sunday, August 7, 2011

Raspberry Jelly Omelet Recipe

Like so many people, I often make the foods of my childhood -- for me, this morning it was the jelly omelet that Minnie, our nanny/housekeeper growing up, had made for me time and time again. I hadn't set out to make a jelly omelet but when I saw the last spoonfuls of homemade raspberry jam that my friend Laurie made, I immediately decided I had to pair some with my fresh farm eggs.

Raspberry Jelly Omelet (Photo: Lexi Van de Walle)

Curious about the origin of jelly omelets, since I don't really know anyone who ate them growing up, and only see them on menus, mostly diners, once in a blue moon, I did a little research.

Jelly omelets have been on American menus and in recipe books since the early 1800's. According to an article in The Montreal Gazette in 1909, the original jelly omelet hails from Germany. Parisian menus featured jelly omelets in the 1930s, and railroad menus of bygone years served jelly omelets in their dining cars. Quince, guava, current, strawberry were among the many flavors, with grape being the most common. Fannie Farmer featured a simple jelly omelet in 1896...

Original 1896 Boston Cooking School Cook-Book by Frannie Merritt Farmer

My recipe, apparently, like Fannie Farmer's version, is the easy jelly omelet recipe and less fluffy than more traditional offerings. Mine is more of pancake egg and I prefer it without any added sugar. Unlike an omelet, a pancake egg is browned on both sides.

RECIPE #1
Easy "Pancake Egg" Version
2 local eggs
1 tablespoon water
1 tablespoon local butter 
2 tablespoons no-sugar raspberry jam

Whisk eggs and water until bright yellow. Heat butter to sizzling in a crepe pan or small no stick pan over medium-high heat. Pour egg mixture into the pan and let set. When the egg is browned, carefully flip using a pancake turner to brown the other side. Add jam. 

RECIPE #2
Jelly Omelet (Fluffy version) featured in The New York Times
Clipping from The New York Times, What Every Woman Wants To Know

If you've never had a jelly omelet then you don't know what you're missing. 

2 comments:

George said...

The jelly omelet looks delicious.

Cathy Crothers said...

I'm reading an article about Hitler, how he lived in his underground bunker. He had a vegetarian chef cook Jellied Omlets for his meals. I'm thinking a jellied omlet is just a step to the left of a crepe.

"Crêpes are popular not only throughout France but elsewhere in Europe where the pancakes go by other names and adaptations, including Italian crespelle, Hungarian palacsintas, Jewish blintzes, Scandinavian plattars, Russian blini, and Greek kreps."